Communal Table – A Cob Oven and the 36-Hour Dinner Party

Shared meals have always been about community, about what happens among family and friends — even enemies — when they gather around a table to eat; but once upon a time, before every family had its own kitchen in which Mom labored more or less alone, cooking was itself a social activity, one that fostered community and conversation around the chopping board or cook fire long before the meal was served

via Communal Table – A Cob Oven and the 36-Hour Dinner Party – NYTimes.com.

Meals and community are intertwined. It’s encouraging to see such a strong movement in the social significance of food, not just because of our efforts at Foodtree but because everyone who starts to contemplate the significance of their meals gets more pleasure out of them. We’re starting to treat our food as a meaningful aspect of our daily experience, which is certainly far more human than the alternative.

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